Saturday, June 5, 2010

the essence of Dzogchen in six lines

The nature of phenomena is non-dual,

but each one, in its own state, is beyond the limits of the mind.

There is no concept that can define the condition of "what is"

but vision nevertheless manifests: complete as it is.

Everything already IS, and so, without the need for effort,

one finds oneself in the self-perfected state: this is contemplation.

6 comments:

  1. "having overcome the need for effort,

    one finds oneself in the self-perfected state..."

    I love the irony that when we stop trying to improve ourselves we discover our perfection.

    Thank you for this post :)

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  2. Hi Colleen, I would say that Dzogchen, The Great Perfection points to the "perfection" of Isness - everything IS perfectly. It may BE a horror, but it IS so, pefectly. Do you see what I mean?

    Diane, I think that's why Dzogchen says things like, "leave things as they are." They're pointing to "the dimension" of Isness.

    Colleen, your comment re irony helped me notice the irony inherent in the phrase, "having OVERCOME the need for effort."

    Oh well, there must be a less contradictory way of saying that - but it will have to wait.

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  3. I found the Six Lines in a book titled "Dzogchen - the Self-Perfected State" by Namkhai Norbu. I have been modifying them for this blog. You can see Norbu's version, which he calls "The Six Vajra Verses" and his valuable commentary in the aforementioned book.

    BTW, that is also the source of the recent blog post titled "tools."

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  4. Thanks for providing the book title.

    This is may favorite part of this post:

    "There is no concept that can define the condition of 'what is' but vision nevertheless manifests: complete as it is."

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